Communication

24 06 2009

HandphoneCommunication is the process whereby information is imparted by a sender to a receiver via a medium. Communication requires that all parties have an area of communicative commonality. There are auditory means, such as speaking, singing and sometimes tone of voice, and nonverbal, physical means, such as body languagesign languageparalanguagetoucheye contact, by using writing. Communication is defined as a process by which we assign and convey meaning in an attempt to create shared understanding. This process requires a fast repertoire of skills in intrapersonal and interpersonal processing, listening, observing, speaking, questioning, analyzing, and evaluating.

Communication is defined as a process by which we assign and convey meaning in an attempt to create shared understanding. This process requires a vast repertoire of skills in intrapersonal and interpersonal processing, listening, observing, speaking, questioning, analyzing, and evaluating. Use of these processes is developmental and transfers to all areas of life: home, school, community, work, and beyond. It is through communication that collaboration and cooperation occur. Communication is the exchange of ideas and information among living things. Communication is a system that humans certainly use every day. We speak to people, write messages, use the telephone, watch television, listen to the radio, use a computer, and more. Communication is sharing knowledge, telling news, expressing feelings, and being heard. It takes two to communicate one to say it and one to listen and respond.

Communication is the articulation of sending a message through different media, whether it be verbal or nonverbal, so long as a being transmits a thought provoking idea, gesture, action, and so on.  Communication as an academic discipline relates to all the ways we communicate, so it embraces a large body of study and knowledge. The communication discipline includes both verbal and nonverbal messages. A body of scholarship all about communication is presented and explained in text books, electronic publications, and academic journals. Communication happens at many levels even for one single action, in many different ways, and for most beings, as well as certain machines. Several, if not all, fields of study dedicate a portion of attention to communication, so when speaking about communication it is very important to be sure about what aspects of communication one is speaking.

Communication is usually described along a few major dimensions: Content (what type of things are communicated), source, emisor, sender or encoder (by whom), form (in which form), channel (through which medium), destination, receiver, target or decoder (to whom), and the purpose or pragmatic aspect. Between parties, communication includes acts that confer knowledge and experiences, give advice and commands, and ask questions. These acts may take many forms, in one of the various manners of communication. The form depends on the abilities of the group communicating. Together, communication content and form make messages that are sent towards a destination. The target can be oneself, another person or being, another entity such as a corporation or group of beings. Communication can be seen as processes of information transmission governed by three levels of semiotic rules:

  1. Syntactic is a formal properties of signs and symbols.
  2. Pragmatic describe about concerned with the relations between signs or expressions and their users.
  3. Semantic is study of relationships between signs and symbols and what they represent.

Therefore, communication is social interaction where at least two interacting agents share a common set of signs and a common set of semiotic rules. This commonly held rules in some sense ignores communication, including intrapersonal communication via diaries or self-talk, both secondary phenomena that followed the primary acquisition of communicative competences within social interactions.

In a simple model, information is sent in some form from an emisor or sender or encoder to a destination or receiver decoder. In a slightly more complex form a sender and a receiver are linked reciprocally. A particular instance of communication is called speech act. In the presence of “communication noise” on the transmission channel (air, in this case), reception and decoding of content may be faulty, and the speech act may not achieve the desired effect. One problem with this encode-transmit-receive-decode model is that the processes of encoding and decoding imply that the sender and receiver each possess something that functions as a code book, and that these two code books are, at the very least, similar if not identical. Although something like code books is implied by the model, they are nowhere represented in the model, which creates many conceptual difficulties. Theories of coregulation describe communication as a creative and dynamic continuous process, rather than a discrete exchange of information.


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24 06 2009
aguswirawan

artikel ini cukup memberi saya informasi dalam mengerjakan tugas.

24 06 2009
aguswirawan

Thank before for your attention of my posted artikel




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